Friday, November 30, 2012

The Opportunity Of Adversity

Hello, Tonight Aimee Mullins was featured as the "Person of the Week" on World news with Diane Sawyer. I was so inspired by her that I had to share her and her story with you. One particular thing she said on the program truly touched me today and I think it will do the same to you. "The only Disability in life is a crushed spirit" Truer words were never spoken in my opinion. Watching this video will be worth your time and leave you in a better place.
Thanks for visiting,
Janet :)




Here is some of the text from her speech:
I'd like to share with you a discovery that I made a few months ago while writing an article for Italian Wired. I always keep my thesaurus handy whenever I'm writing anything, but I'd already finished editing the piece, and I realized that I had never once in my life looked up the word "disabled" to see what I'd find.

Let me read you the entry. "Disabled, adjective: crippled, helpless, useless, wrecked, stalled, maimed, wounded, mangled, lame, mutilated, run-down, worn-out, weakened, impotent, castrated, paralyzed, handicapped, senile, decrepit, laid-up, done-up, done-for, done-in cracked-up, counted-out; see also hurt, useless and weak. Antonyms, healthy, strong, capable." I was reading this list out loud to a friend and at first was laughing, it was so ludicrous, but I'd just gotten past "mangled," and my voice broke, and I had to stop and collect myself from the emotional shock and impact that the assault from these words unleashed.

You know, of course, this is my raggedy old thesaurus so I'm thinking this must be an ancient print date, right? But, in fact, the print date was the early 1980s, when I would have been starting primary school and forming an understanding of myself outside the family unit and as related to the other kids and the world around me. And, needless to say, thank God I wasn't using a thesaurus back then. I mean, from this entry, it would seem that I was born into a world that perceived someone like me to have nothing positive whatsoever going for them, when in fact, today I'm celebrated for the opportunities and adventures my life has procured.

So, I immediately went to look up the 2009 online edition, expecting to find a revision worth noting. Here's the updated version of this entry. Unfortunately, it's not much better. I find the last two words under "Near Antonyms," particularly unsettling: "whole" and "wholesome."

So, it's not just about the words. It's what we believe about people when we name them with these words. It's about the values behind the words, and how we construct those values. Our language affects our thinking and how we view the world and how we view other people. In fact, many ancient societies, including the Greeks and the Romans, believed that to utter a curse verbally was so powerful, because to say the thing out loud brought it into existence. So, what reality do we want to call into existence: a person who is limited, or a person who's empowered? By casually doing something as simple as naming a person, a child, we might be putting lids and casting shadows on their power. Wouldn't we want to open doors for them instead?

2 comments:

  1. Great post and very helpful to me as I am also labeled disabled!!

    Thanks for this site. I can't believe more people don't leave comments.

    Happy weekend!
    Jackie:-)

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    Replies
    1. Thank you Jackie, I really appreciate your support and I agree, I wonder why I don't get any comments on some of these posts, I almost start to think maybe I'm wasting my time doing this, sad, but true!
      Hugs,
      xoxo

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